Tag Archives: hawaiian

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So, who was Prince Kuhio?”, our friend from Oregon asked.

The three locals in the room looked at each other and shrugged in embarrassment. We knew he was a Hawaiian Prince but other than that all we knew about him was that he was a holiday.

So, who was Prince Kuhio? He was a fascinating, internationally educated, charming, passionate man who spent the majority of his life serving his people who he loved deeply.

Born to the sister of Queen Kapi’olani, Esther Kino`iki Ke-kaulike and David Ka-hale-pouli Pi`ikoi, on March 26, 1871, Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole Piʻikoi was adopted by his aunt, Queen Kapi’olani after the death of his parents and was declared a Prince by King Kalaukaua. Prince Kuhio Day is celebrated on his birthday.

Educated in Honolulu, California and England he also traveled extensively throughout the United States and Europe. He was known for his smile and charm and from a young age was affectionately called Prince Cupid.

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Groomed from an early age to be King, he found himself without a kingdom when he was only 22 years old. After an aborted attempt to restore the Kingdom through a revolution, Prince Kuhio and his wife, Elizabeth Kahanu Kalanianaʻole left Hawaii and traveled the world for a few years.

Finally reconciled to the new future of the islands of Hawaii and his people, the Prince of the People as he became known returned to his beloved islands and began to shape the future that we know today.

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The first Native Hawaiian and only member of Congress born as royalty, Prince Jonah Kuhio served 10 terms, almost 20 years in the Senate.

Forty years before Hawaii became a state he drafted the first Hawaii Statehood Act. He moved the hearts of the entire Senate when he spoke of the plight of his people and their dwindling numbers, loss of their land and the fear of losing their culture. Among other accomplishments, he was able to push through legislation for Hawaiian Homelands, set up the current county system, reorganized the Royal Order of King Kamehameha I, was the founder of the Hawaiian Civic Club and dedicated the rest of his life to the betterment of his people.

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The love of the people for Prince Kuhio is shown in the many public places and schools that bear his name. While the Hawaiians did not achieve the independence he originally fought for as a kingdom, they have independence and freedom that allow them to continue to grow as a Hawaiian people, perpetuate the Hawaiian culture and continue the Hawaiian legacy that Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole Piʻikoi, the Prince of the People, spent his life serving.

Susan Noanoa

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Kala Woodglow Tenor Ukulele

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                                                             Map of the Sandwich Isles

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The People of the Sea

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My oldest grandson is a mix of a lot of ethnicities–he is, on one half–Maori, Tongan, Hawaiian, Chinese, Samoan with traces of Fijian and on the other half a European mix from Norway to the Netherlands. His name reflects this mixture, influenced by his Maori, Samoan, Scottish and Tongan ancestors. But it is the name that we are called the most that truly becomes who we are and how we think of ourselves. His name is Ngatiwai. His paternal grandmother, who is Maori, suggested that name, it being the name of her tribe, Ngāti Wai, or the “People of the Sea”.

From Te Ara we learn that “Ngāti Wai are descended from Manaia (the captain of the Māhuhu-ki-te-rangi or Ruakaramea canoe) and his people Ngāti Manaia, and are another earlwhangaruru harbory Whāngārei tribe. The history of Ngāti Wai is intimately connected with the coastal waters. The tribe’s name comes from a tradition at Manawahuna, a cave beneath Motu Kōkako, where priests would foretell their fortunes from the way water (wai) passed through the cave. Well known as coastal raiders and traders, Ngāti Wai have links to ancestors from Whangaroa in the north to Tāmaki (Auckland) in the south, and eastward to Little Barrier and Great Barrier islands where Ngāti Rehua, a sub-tribe of Ngāti Wai, settled. Today, most of the tribe live north and south of Whāngārei, and are interspersed with other coastal groups such as Ngāti Kahu, Te Whānauwhero, Te Ākitai and Te Panupuha.” http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/whangarei-tribes/page-2

In December, Ngatiwai’s younger brother, one-year-old Neeson spent two weeks with his paternal grandparents visiting his great-grandparents who still live on coastal tribal lands in Northland, New Zealand. In the distant past Ngāti Wai traded seafood up and down the coast, interspersed with the occasional raid.

December is summer in the Southern Hemisphere with temperatures in Whangaruru ranging from the mid-fifties at night to the upper seventies during the day. While Ngatiwai was bundled up for a Utah winter Neeson spent his two weeks in Whangaruru running around in a t-shirt and eating seafood for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Ngatiwai and his little sister Ngaio have also spent time in Whangaruru before Neeson was born. Memories that will forever keep them tied to their Maori roots.

northland fish

There is a special feeling about the land your ancestors lived on–a connection that is hard to define. Rock is rock and sand is sand, right? True, until you stand on land that was there hundreds of years before and someone you share a bloodline with once lived there. Then you close your eyes and you can feel the connection, a sense of security in ancestral lines that transcends geology and testifies to a deeper truth–that this rock and this sand connects you to your people.

Ngatiwai may not yet understand the heritage that he carries or the responsibility that comes with the name he bears to represent his people. First grade is a time for friends and playing. But with grandparents and parents who teach him–someday he will come to feel that same connection with the land and the sea that have been the legacy of the Ngāti Wai for over a thousand years.

Susan Noanoa

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creation at dawn      Hawaiian Voyage

Creation at Dawn by Tom Kuali’i                                   Hawaiian Voyage by William Horak